Today, authors have a bevy of free tools at their disposal, all of which can be used to get one’s name out to a large, ever-expanding audience. Following are six free tools for authors looking for recognition online and off:

 

(1). LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com

LinkedIn is an excellent, free platform that authors can use to find and connect with other authors and publishing professionals. Connect with editors, publishers and established authors and begin your journey into professional networking. Exhibit your expert status by answering questions in your field, posting writing samples and including on your profile the titles of works you’ve published.

 

(2). Twitter: http://www.twitter.com

Though it takes a bit of legwork, Twitter can definitely pay off for the author looking to connect with large, inter-connected audiences. With Twitter, the author has the ability to start and maintain conversations with people who might otherwise be unreachable. Joining Twitter groups allows one to target distinct types of followers, allowing the author to pinpoint his/her audience. Once you’ve built a platform, keep your followers engaged by hosting contests on Twitter or tweeting about your book’s launch – free publicity dispersed among your targeted audience!

 

(3). Facebook: http://www.facebook.com

Facebook is one of the largest social networks in existence and is a great place for authors to establish a professional presence. With Facebook, you can connect with other people who are interested in your work, and you are provided with a platform with which to disseminate information and advertise promotions.

 

(4). NanoWriMo: http://www.nanowrimo.org

On NanoWriMo, authors can write their books and gain attention. In 30 days, you can have a completed novel. Along the way, authors can meet other writers who support and comment upon their work, and authors can compete in contests that bring one’s writing to a much larger audience.

 

(5). GoodReads: http://www.goodreads.com 

On GoodReads authors can connect directly with their readers. Not only can you see who is reading your book, you can also see where your work ranks among the thousands of books within GoodReads’ database.

 

(6). YouTube: http://www.youtube.com

YouTube is a great platform on which to connect with your readers. Try publishing informative videos or create a book trailer to promote your next release. Much like a movie trailer, a video book trailer provides a quick and visual synopsis that can easily go viral. On YouTube, your audience can share the videos that you upload across multiple popular platforms, increasing the likelihood that your book will reach a larger audience.

About the author

Rachel Rachel Brownlow is founder and CEO of Your Written Word LLC, a ghostwriting company that helps successful and aspiring business leaders take their ideas from conception to publication. She has written, edited, proofread, consulted and/or created publishing proposals for more than a dozen nonfiction books. She also contributes to a variety of magazines and publications, including the Austin Business Journal, Austin Monthly, NSIDE Magazine and Georgetown View Magazine. You can find more of her work at rachelbrownlow.com/portfolio.